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Hip Replacement


A hip replacement is a common type of surgery where a damaged hip joint is replaced with an artificial one (known as a prosthesis).
Adults of any age can be considered for a hip replacement, although most are carried out on people between the ages of 60 and 80.
A modern artificial hip joint is designed to last for at least 15 years. Most people experience a significant reduction in pain and some improvement in their range of movement.

Hip replacement surgery is usually necessary when the hip joint is worn or damaged to the extent that your mobility is reduced and you experience pain even while resting.

Hip replacement, is a surgical procedure in which the hip joint is replaced by a prosthetic implant. Replacing the hip joint consists of replacement each the acetabulum and the femoral head. Such joint replacement orthopaedic surgery generally is conducted to relieve arthritis pain or fix severe physical joint injury as a part of hip fracture treatment.
Hip replacement surgery is for people with severe hip injury. Once you have a hip replacement, the hip surgeon removes damaged cartilage and bone from your hip joint and replaces them with new, man-made parts. This could relieve pain, reduce hip stiffness and help your hip joint work well, and improve your walking and alternative movements. Your doctor might suggest it if you have got hip issues and pain, and physical therapy, medicines and exercise do not facilitate. The most common problem after surgery is hip dislocation. Because a man-made hip is smaller than the original joint, the ball can come out of its socket. The surgery can also cause blood clots and infections. After a hip replacement, you might need to avoid certain activities, such as jogging and high-impact sports.

Recovering From Hip Replacement Surgery

The rehabilitation process after surgery can be a demanding time and requires commitment. For the first four to six weeks after the operation you'll need a walking aid, such as crutches, to help support you. You may also be enrolled on an exercise programme that's designed to help you regain and then improve the use of your new hip joint. Most people are able to resume normal activities within two to three months but it can take up to a year before you experience the full benefits of your new hip.